Global Art

Tienamen Square- NCTA China/Korea study tour

Tienamen Square- NCTA China/Korea study tour

My Portrait

My name is Pamela Valentine.  Mine is the best job in the world!  I am a Global Art Teacher, technology coordinator, and an exchange coordinator at ISA.  Here is an image of me on a study tour that took me to China and then Korea.  I love traveling to Asia.  Three times I have had fellowships to Japan and have taken students to Japan six times.  I feel that my travel experiences color my teaching in Global Art.  Two units of study show this influence: 1) digital haiku, a multimedia photograph and poem influenced by the 17th century Japanese poet, Matsuo Bashoo and 2) Asian Inspired Ceramics, where students use elements of a piece of Asian ceramics that they have researched.

See my teacher web page for more information and resources about Global Art.

Please visit our gallery as it grows. My blog will mirror that of the students in Global Art.  For each project that they do, I will include my thoughts and reflections on the project and its products.

View full screen by clicking on the center of the image.

Value Scribbles

“Value Scribbles” is the first project that students create each year.  It is a good way to introduce the students to the Global Art class.  They begin drawing day one with an exercise I call, “whirlwinds”.  This give them practice and builds skill using an ebony pencil.  The goal is to draw a range of values from light, light to heavy black.  The challenge comes on the light side. After whirlwinds, usually the second day, students select the format for their drawing.  They can choose a square or a rectangle.  Leaving a border of about ½ inch around the edge for future matting and framing, they draw a non-objective kind of scribble drawing.  Students can visualize a situation, person, or emotion.  Just as Jackson Pollock attempted to express directly on a canvas, these young artists express directly on the paper. It is always a wonder to me how the drawings show individuality and creativity given that everyone is doing the same project.  I am very proud of the work that the students created.  Please enjoy them in the slide show above. The second part of the unit had students photograph and crop their images before creating a slide show to embed in their Global Art portfolio.  Each project that is created this year is documented with a photograph as well as an artist’s statement.

Drawing Unit Students looked at the work of Betty Edwards and Daniel Pink and the relationship between brain functions and skills.  Even though many of the exercises were difficult, they remained focused and tried.   I have taught these lessons dozens of times and am still impressed with the students and their willingness to take risks.


View full screen by clicking on the center of the image.

Picasso Upside Down – copying an image by Picasso upside down challenged the the students to trust the ability of the right hemisphere to see relationships and space.

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

The final drawing of white styrofoam spheres on white paper help students use the perception skills that they developed: edges, space, values, and relationships. Note: Each student photographed their won work that is pictured above.


View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

Digital Haiku 2010

This is an interdisciplinary lesson inspired by 17th century Japanese poet, Matsuo Bashō, and his quest to capture a sense of sacred place through words and images. Students use digital photography and simple editing software to create images from nature, compose haiku, and combine text and image into a multimedia presentation. Students traveled to the San Antonio Botanical Gardens and collected images and words.  Most were challenged when asked to write ten versions of the same poem, but that exercise help them to refine their poem.  Enjoy their quest to find the “sacred in the mundane”.  Notice the composition of the photograph as well as the layout of the slide with image and words.

Many thanks to the parents who chaperoned the trip and to the ISA  Amigos who make field trips like these available to all students.

Ceramics Unit

Mexican Talavera

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

Students examine several traditions and culture in their study of ceramics.  In addition to exploring the concept of “form follows function”, students look at basic hand building techniques. For their first project they look at Chinese, Arabic, Italian, and Spanish influences on Talavera Mexican ceramics.  Students use a pinch method to construct a ceramic bell and clapper.  The pieces are underglazed with a creamy white before decorated in designs seen on Talavera pieces.  They have a choice of using the traditional cobalt blue color, yellow, and/or green.

Asian Inspired Vessels

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.
2009 gallery

For this projects students visit the San Antonio Museum of Art.  At the museum the students take the docent lead tour “Asian Caravan” to get background on the culture and technical aspects of the collection.  Students select a piece from any Asian country and incorporate one or two attributes of the piece into their own design.  The emphasis is to inspire rather than copy.

Collections Sculpture

Students create an original piece that is composed of multiple recognizable objects (a collection), refashion them into something new.

It is:
- representational (represent something – not non-objective)
- sculptural (3 D
- communicate a concept.

There are no requirements for scale except for the ability to gather materials and have space to work.

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

Water color exercise extensions.

Students push their creativity as they take water color exercises and extend them by weaving or ink enhancements.

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

Sumi e Paintings

Students develop skill with bamboo brushes and ink applying wet on wet, wet on dry, and dry on dry.  They practice washes and painting bamboo before creating these final paintings.

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

Inspired Paintings

While looking at examples of paintings from a variety of artists students explore abstract to photo realistic styles as well as color theory.

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

Students:
- select a favored photograph that they have taken
- decide on a style
- lightly sketch a plan on canvas paper
- decide on color scheme or system
- paint with tempera

View full screen by clicking on the icon in the lower right corner.

Global Art Portfolio Review

Creativity

Explain how this piece of artwork best illustrates your creativity.

6.Guerra.Mandala

“ Mandalas” is one of our early projects.  Because students still have to develop technical drawing skill as well as craft an image that communicates their identity.  My creativity involves helping students realize that there is freedom within the parameters of the assignments. I also must find creative ways to help students see how to use image to communicate their personal identity.

Title: Mandalas
Medium: Prisma colors
Date: Fall 2010

Maria G.

Skill
Explain how this artwork demonstrates technical ability and skill.

Slide2

Title: Digital Haiku
Medium: Digital Photography
Fall 2009
Allison S.

“Digital Haiku” probably required the greatest amount of technical skill.  Students had to learn not only the basics of photography (sighting, holding the camera level, correct settings) they also had to know how to crop and optimize their images.   That was only part of the unit!  There were two historical pieces: history of photography, mentioning Alfred Stieglitz, and the cultural and historical reference to Matsuo Bashō and the Japanese National Treasures.  Additional technical challenges included writing haiku and putting the image and the words together in a balanced format.  Yes, “Digital Haiku” has to be at the top of the list for most challenging for teaching and most challenging for the number of skills for  students to master.

Culture

Slide8We looked at many artists and cultures from around the world.  Select one of your pieces and explain any global influences that you see in your artwork.

Title:Talavera Bells
Medium: Stoneware

Date: Fall 2010
Artist:

“Talavera Bells” best illustrates cultural connections.  We saw how this Mexican ceramic tradition displays influences from China, Arabia, Italy, and Spain.  Our trip to SAMA’s Asian ceramic galleries helped us see how cobalt blue glaze used in China found its way to Mexico.

Personal Challenge and Fulfillment

Presentation1Tell us why this project was a personal challenge and what you feel about the finished product.

Title:Talavera Bells
Medium: Stoneware

Date: Fall 2010
Artist:

“Collections” is always a challenge.  By this time in the year students had enough skill and confidence to make more decisions about their artwork.  Support for this project ranged from just finding a material, to crafting a meaningful concept to communicate, to the construction of the sculpture.

4yprysyazhnyukhaikuWhich project was the most fun for you to create?  Explain why it was fun.

Title: Digital Haiku
Medium: Digital Photography

Date: Fall 2010
Yeva Y.

The field trip to Botanical Gardens provided students with time to collect images for their haiku.  It is fun to see students wandering around snapping photographs and writing in their small notebooks.



Leave a Reply